Topic:   Health Science

An inside look at COVID-19 care responses and innovation efforts within University of Washington Medicine :: an ask for those learning to code :: and a followup post on Reddit in /r/Entrepreneur

I sat down last week with a few folks from UW Medicine and learned about their amazing response to COVID-19. Being on the front-lines of the pandemic in the USA, it is extremely admirable how they organized themselves, formed an innovation group, and opened sourced their efforts to help healthcare communities around the world.

COVID-19 response and innovation at University of Washington Medicine. Plus, a call-to-action for medical technology entrepreneurs :: with Danica Little, Dimitry Levin, and Dr. Robert Sweet

In this episode of Ventures we look at the response to COVID-19 by teams involved with emergency preparedness and innovation at University of Washington (UW) Medicine in Seattle. We also discuss the need and options available for startups to collaborate with UW Medicine to help - not only with COVID-19 relief - but with general medtech and telehealth innovation to provide better care for patients in a post-COVID-19 world.

Social entrepreneurship, Nuralink, Reddit, and my health science N=1 experiment this past spring

This week’s episode of Ventures explores entrepreneurial efforts to help the poorest of the poor globally. There is a lot to learn and digest here, and I’m excited to share this important conversation. (Also, a few thoughts on Nuralink, my Reddit post from last week, and my final writeup of the Whoop/AppleWatch/OuraRing N=1 experiment).

Whoop vs. Oura Ring vs. Apple Watch for Optimizing Sleep and Workout Performance with Continuous Glucose Monitoring and One Meal a Day: Part 2

In the initial post for this series I shared the basic experimental setup and example data output. Here, in the second and final part of this series, I’m going to dive into notable variables and examine the overall data to conclude initial lessons learned from this 30-day experiment. As a quick reminder, during the initial part of the spring 2020 COVID-19 quarantine I decided to wear a Continuous Glucose Monitor while testing the differences between Whoop, Apple Watch, and Oura Ring. I had already been doing daily time-window eating between ~5:30-7:30pm (i.e. One Meal a Day, “OMAD”) for 6-7 months, and my ultimate goal with this N=1 experiment was to figure out how to optimize sleep and workout performance by tweaking food/drink intake and timing.

Whoop vs. Oura Ring vs. Apple Watch for Optimizing Sleep and Workout Performance with Continuous Glucose Monitoring and One Meal a Day: Part 1

Wearables are all the rage these days. However, beyond their fancy and comprehensive marketing campaigns, I’m curious - from a scientific perspective - how helpful, reliable, and accurate are these products? I’m skeptical, of course, but the future looks promising. While these current products are far from perfect, they hint at an exciting vision for improving our health.

Life Sciences Entrepreneurship & Price Transparency in Healthcare with Dr. Jeffrey Roh, Susie Kataoka, and Dr. Tony Little

In this first audio/video episode of Ventures, we discuss with Dr. Jeffrey Roh, Susie Kataoka, and Dr. Tony Little the importance of cost and price transparency in healthcare today. We also discuss the current landscape/opportunity for starting new ventures in the life sciences.

COVID-19 Science Logbook (Jan-May, 2020)

This logbook is where I recorded my notes on COVID-19 from January 2020 through May 2020. For future posts on COVID-19 and/or SARS-CoV-2, follow my “COVID-19” topic on my subscribe page.

Coronavirus Disease 2019 (COVID-19): Understanding the epidemiology, biochemistry, and cognitive biases regarding the spread of — and our reaction to — SARS-CoV-2

With so much misinformation out there and understandable concern regarding this disease (COVID-19), and the virus that causes it (SARS-CoV-2), the goal of this article is to help provide a scientific foundation to better process information and decide how to act. I’ll introduce the basics of epidemiology, how epidemiologists around the world are considering and responding to COVID-19, what SARS-CoV-2 is exactly and how it spreads, the status of vaccines and antiviral drug developments, and what cognitive biases are at play as we individually and collectively react to this global pandemic.

The link between acrylamide, coffee, and cancer: Here’s what scientists know (and don’t know)

A judge in California ruled this week that Starbucks, 7-Eleven, and many other businesses that sell coffee need to warn consumers via food labels about the ingestion of acrylamide. California’s Prop 65 states that businesses selling products that contain one or more of 65 chemicals shown by scientists to cause cancer and/or reproductive disease must give customers a “clear and reasonable” heads up.

The Science of Healthy Fats

The world is waking up to the reality that sugar and refined carbohydrates are more to blame for the diseases of western civilization than salt or fats. Still, there remains confusion about the health implications of consuming fat. What does modern research have to say about the effects of saturated fat, omega-3s/6s/9s, and short/medium/long-chain triglycerides? What are nutritionists referring to when they use the term “healthy fats”, and what exactly makes fat healthy versus unhealthy?

The science of salt and electrolytes (are we consuming enough?)

Modern science has revealed that we were wrong (and fooled) yet again. As it turns out, mineral deficiencies are likely more of a problem than we realize, as not consuming enough salt and electrolytes is both easy to do and dangerous for our health.

The Science of Optimal Sleep: Introduction to Nutritional Biochemistry, Part 5

In the previous four articles in this series we looked at fat loss, muscle gain, hydration, and flexibility. Here, we finish the series by turning our attention to sleep.

How to increase muscle flexibility: Introduction to Nutritional Biochemistry, Part 4

In the first three articles in this series we looked at fat loss, muscle gain, and hydration. Here, we turn our attention to the science behind muscle flexibility.

How to stay hydrated (and reduce headaches, hangovers, and fat): Introduction to Nutritional Biochemistry, Part 3

In the first two articles of this series we looked at the science behind how to shrink fat cells and grow muscle cells. Here, we take aim at hydration.

How to grow muscles: Introduction to Nutritional Biochemistry, Part 2

After looking at the science behind how to shrink fat cells in the previous post of this 5-part series, we now turn our attention to muscles and how to increase their size.