Topic:   Health Science

HealthTech entrepreneurship, surviving cancer, and starting FertilityAnswers :: with Alice Crisci

In this episode of Ventures, my guest Alice Crisci (https://www.instagram.com/fertilityanswers_/) and I discuss her journey as a cancer survivor and entrepreneur in the medical/fertility space. While many people turn to “Dr. Google” when trying to find answers to their medical questions, Alice and her team have created a more sophisticated and personalized approach for finding answers to fertility-related questions. In addition to talking about MedAnswers and their first vertical, FertilityAnswers, Alice and I also talk about mental health for founders, how to validate an initial entrepreneurial idea, and how to think about smart resource allocations for effective go-to-market strategies.

Virtual identities, a primer on antigens and vaccines, and the New Magic is Turbo

In this newsletter I write about this week's podcast, a primer I wrote on viruses, antigens, antibodies, contagiousness, vaccines, and COVID-19 testing, and the release of Hotwire and Turbo in the Rails community.

A primer on viruses, antigens, antibodies, contagiousness, vaccines, and COVID-19 testing

Like millions of households around the world right now, my family and I recently caught a virus. Trillions of the little buggers invaded at least my sons (9 & 14 years old) while my wife and I - along with our 12-yr old daughter - wondered if we were all getting COVID-19. Our tests came back negative, but during the 70 hours we waited for results, we spent a lot of time researching immunology and discussing what to do.

Taking back the Internet, more promising vaccine data, luciferase, and an idea about opt-in discussions on Satchel

In this newsletter I discuss my podcast episode this week with Andy Cronk, Moderna's vaccine, an interesting laboratory technique, and a better signal-to-noice UX that I'm thinking about and could help refining.

Blockchains, vaccines, and a promising future

In this newsletter I discuss this week's podcast on blockchains, and the great news from Pfizer and BioNTech regarding their vaccine.

Wisdom for entrepreneurs, Bio Eats World, and remember to register for this Saturday’s A Night of REST

A new podcast with Troy Henikoff, a new (long) article on how to prepare for bio eating the world, and a reminder to register for A Night of REST.

How to prepare for (and participate in) biology eating the world

About a year ago, Vijay Pande over at A16z published Biology is Eating the World: A Manifesto, which echoes Marc Andreessen’s famous thesis that software is eating the world (i.e. that code is being relentlessly applied to all niches of business and industry to provide value). While the era of software is well underway, I agree with Vijay that we’re entering a new era where biology has “shifted from an empirical science to an engineering discipline” and that “we have finally begun using nature’s own machinery—through biological engineering—to design, scale, and transform biology.”

From idea to exit in a few years, setting up a mac for web development, and followup from last week's episode on Lipidology

This week I’m honored to have two friends of mine share their story of building and growing a company, getting acquired, and merging in with a larger organization. I also share a screencast for Mac users setting up their computers for web development, and follow up from last's week's episode on lipidology.

Lipidology with Dave :: Code with Isaac. Plus, are "mainstream" and "keto" actually getting along?

In this week’s episode of Ventures, Dave Feldman (@DaveKeto) was kind enough to sit down with me and answer a ton of questions. Also, Isaac from South Carolina (14yrs old) sat down with me to walk through setting up his local Windows machine for Ruby on Rails web development.

Cholesterol, lipidology, ketogenic diets, N=1 experiments, and the future of health technology :: with Dave Feldman

In this episode of Ventures, my guest Dave Feldman (@DaveKeto) and I discuss a variety of topics related to lipids, immunology, ketogenic diets, and the future of health tech. I first came across Dave’s work when I noticed my cholesterol levels (specifically LDL-C) raised significantly when fasting and/or low-carb dieting, and I found that there is a large community of people who have noticed the same phenomenon. Dave has helped pioneer efforts to formulate hypotheses around why this might be the case, and why LDL levels in our blood may be considerably more complex than we’ve been led to believe.

An inside look at COVID-19 care responses and innovation efforts within University of Washington Medicine :: an ask for those learning to code :: and a followup post on Reddit in /r/Entrepreneur

I sat down last week with a few folks from UW Medicine and learned about their amazing response to COVID-19. Being on the front-lines of the pandemic in the USA, it is extremely admirable how they organized themselves, formed an innovation group, and opened sourced their efforts to help healthcare communities around the world.

COVID-19 response and innovation at University of Washington Medicine. Plus, a call-to-action for medical technology entrepreneurs :: with Danica Little, Dimitry Levin, and Dr. Robert Sweet

In this episode of Ventures we look at the response to COVID-19 by teams involved with emergency preparedness and innovation at University of Washington (UW) Medicine in Seattle. We also discuss the need and options available for startups to collaborate with UW Medicine to help - not only with COVID-19 relief - but with general medtech and telehealth innovation to provide better care for patients in a post-COVID-19 world.

Social entrepreneurship, Nuralink, Reddit, and my health science N=1 experiment this past spring

This week’s episode of Ventures explores entrepreneurial efforts to help the poorest of the poor globally. There is a lot to learn and digest here, and I’m excited to share this important conversation. (Also, a few thoughts on Nuralink, my Reddit post from last week, and my final writeup of the Whoop/AppleWatch/OuraRing N=1 experiment).

Whoop vs. Oura Ring vs. Apple Watch for Optimizing Sleep and Workout Performance with Continuous Glucose Monitoring and One Meal a Day: Part 2

In the initial post for this series I shared the basic experimental setup and example data output. Here, in the second and final part of this series, I’m going to dive into notable variables and examine the overall data to conclude initial lessons learned from this 30-day experiment. As a quick reminder, during the initial part of the spring 2020 COVID-19 quarantine I decided to wear a Continuous Glucose Monitor while testing the differences between Whoop, Apple Watch, and Oura Ring. I had already been doing daily time-window eating between ~5:30-7:30pm (i.e. One Meal a Day, “OMAD”) for 6-7 months, and my ultimate goal with this N=1 experiment was to figure out how to optimize sleep and workout performance by tweaking food/drink intake and timing.

Whoop vs. Oura Ring vs. Apple Watch for Optimizing Sleep and Workout Performance with Continuous Glucose Monitoring and One Meal a Day: Part 1

Wearables are all the rage these days. However, beyond their fancy and comprehensive marketing campaigns, I’m curious - from a scientific perspective - how helpful, reliable, and accurate are these products? I’m skeptical, of course, but the future looks promising. While these current products are far from perfect, they hint at an exciting vision for improving our health.