Topic:   Sociology

Managing marketing data in a growing startup, and reflections on last week's The Economist cover article

In this newsletter I comment on this week's podcast episode and last week's The Economist cover article: 'The threat from the illiberal left'

The Amare Wave, love vs. war in business, and uplifting customers :: with Moshe Engelberg

In this episode of Ventures, my guest Moshe Engelberg (https://www.linkedin.com/in/mosheengelberg/) and I discuss his book The Amare Wave: Uplifting Business by Putting Love to Work. From an entrepreneurial lens, we cover topics including loving customers, helping customers love your business, example case studies from a new founder perspective, and the existential purpose of every for-profit and nonprofit organization on the planet.

Self-discovery, discerning our limits, and transitioning from idealism :: with Kathryn Little

In this special episode of Ventures, Kathryn Little (my amazing mother) and I discuss finding oneself, discovering purpose, transitioning out of idealism, saying yes and no to the right things, processing grief, marriage, parenting, and being who you are as an entrepreneur and human being. Indeed, when thinking about the best possible guest for this episode, I asked my mother and she graciously agreed to share her story and insights.

Connecting people, building community, and learning from super connectors :: with Weston Woodward and Sol Cates

In this episode of Ventures, my guests Weston Woodward (https://www.linkedin.com/in/westonwoodward/), Sol Cates (https://www.linkedin.com/in/solcates/), and I discuss community building from a personal, startup, and local city perspective. We talk about how to listen and ask questions, effectively connect people to help raise the tide for everyone, advice for startup founders, and thoughts about social media and the future of communication in the Web 3.0 era.

One From Many: Lessons for the Web 3.0 generation from Dee Hock's book on VISA and the rise of Chaordic Organization

In his book One From Many (2005), Dee Hock beautifully tells the founding story of VISA and weaves in his concerns about centralized, command-and-control organizational structures. As an alternative solution, Dee describes his vision for “Chaordic” (Chaos + Order) organization and how VISA was started with such principles. You can read the Amazon reviews for the gist of the story and how most people think about it. Here, I’m going to focus on a few things that stood out to me regarding lessons for the Web 3.0 generation.

If it's going to trigger them, don't send it

I turned 40 last summer and, while apparently 40 is the new 30, I still feel “old”, especially with two teenagers in the house now. I’ve been reflecting on the classic question: “What advice would I give my younger self?” There is an immediate topic that comes to mind: written communication.

Finding purpose, embracing curiosity, and navigating career paths in the 2020s :: with Kim Porter, Eric Sullivan, and Sol Cates

In this episode of Ventures, my guests Kim Porter (https://hatchone.com), Eric Sullivan (https://thumos.io/), Sol Cates (https://www.linkedin.com/in/sol-cates-649736/) and I go “meta” and ask questions about questions. We discuss creatively in career paths, finding purpose, doing good, helping humans flourish, proving middle-schoolers with mentorship and encouragement, pursuing interesting professional questions, and connecting people.

Testing out a new private commenting experience on Satchel

Following up on my newsletter from last week, I’ve worked on a new private commenting experience on Satchel this weekend and I’d appreciate any/all feedback.

Are the algorithms going to lead us into war?

First, my guest on the podcast this week (John Biggs, https://twitter.com/johnbiggs, https://www.linkedin.com/in/johndbiggs/) is an entrepreneur, writer, and technologist. Second, I have a few thoughts on what algorithms - specifically social media algorithms - are doing to our brains and society at large.

The Dark Triad: Why we love to empower Machiavellian Psychopathic Narcissists

Psychiatrists identify the Dark Triad as a set of mental illnesses, where those most severely affected usually end up in jail. Those with more mild cases, however, often become very successful.