Topic:   Health Science

How to stay hydrated (and reduce headaches, hangovers, and fat): Introduction to Nutritional Biochemistry, Part 3

In the first two articles of this series we looked at the science behind how to shrink fat cells and grow muscle cells. Here, we take aim at hydration.

How to grow muscles: Introduction to Nutritional Biochemistry, Part 2

After looking at the science behind how to shrink fat cells in the previous post of this 5-part series, we now turn our attention to muscles and how to increase their size.

The calories vs. hormones debate for shrinking fat cells: It’s both…and it varies from person to person, season to season

So there are pro-macro and anti-macro tribes out there, each with valid arguments. (If you’re not up on the lingo, when a fitness-y person asks “what are your macros?”, they are asking what your daily calories are from carb/protein/fat).

How to shrink fat cells: Practical Nutritional Biochemistry, Part 1

We’re going to laser-beam in this 5-part series on the basic science behind how to shrink fat cells, grow muscle cells, get flexible, stay hydrated, and sleep well. We’ll move quickly and link to a variety of sources for further reading.

The 43+ health benefits of ketogenic dieting (in addition to weight loss)

For those unfamiliar, ketogenic dieting is any diet plan “low-carb” enough to switch your body into a state of producing and burning a significant amount of ketones, specifically acetoacetate (AcAc) and its derivatives beta-hydroxybutyrate (BHB) and acetone. These molecules, especially AcAc and BHB, are used by the brain and other tissues for energy, and facilitate a number of health benefits that I’ll address below.

Summarizing the science behind ketogenic (low-carb) diets

After publishing The Science Behind Fat Metabolism a couple weeks ago, I received a tremendous amount of helpful feedback from scientists, medical professionals, and other health experts. Cheers, Internet. I appreciate the feedback and refinement. I’ve updated the article accordingly and will continue to do so as more comments are submitted. I also got a bunch of questions about low-carb dieting, hence my attempt in this article to summarize the underlying science. As always, if you read anything below that needs changing, let me know and I’ll do so quickly.

The Science Behind Fat Metabolism

The concentration of glucose in your blood is the critical upstream switch that places your body into a “fat-storing” or “fat-burning” state. The metabolic efficiency of either state — and the time it takes to get into one from the other — depends on a large variety of factors such as food and drink volume and composition, vitamin and mineral balances, stress, hydration, liver and pancreas function, insulin sensitivity, exercise, mental health, and sleep.