Topic:   Blockchains

Taking back the Internet, more promising vaccine data, luciferase, and an idea about opt-in discussions on Satchel

In this newsletter I discuss my podcast episode this week with Andy Cronk, Moderna's vaccine, an interesting laboratory technique, and a better signal-to-noice UX that I'm thinking about and could help refining.

Taking back the Internet: Blockchains, Privacy, Web 3.0, and Figment.io :: with Andrew Cronk

In this episode of Ventures, my guest Andrew Cronk (Co-Founder, Figment.io) and I discuss practical ways to engage with the Web 3.0 stack, how to keep up with information in the blockchain space, how to learn and teach others about crypto technologies, and where everyone is going to be storing and sharing baby photos in the future.

Blockchains, vaccines, and a promising future

In this newsletter I discuss this week's podcast on blockchains, and the great news from Pfizer and BioNTech regarding their vaccine.

What’s up with Blockchain? Web 3.0, DeFi, and scaling trust :: with Spencer Graham and Tony Little

In this episode of Ventures, I discuss with my guests Spencer Graham (https://twitter.com/spengrah) and Tony Little (https://twitter.com/DrTonyLittle) the past, present, and future of blockchain technologies and Web 3.0.

Emerging technology, startup funding, and books for entrepreneurs :: with John Biggs

My guest this week (John Biggs, https://twitter.com/johnbiggs, https://www.linkedin.com/in/johndbiggs/) is an entrepreneur, writer, and technologist. He was the east coast editor at TechCrunch for fifteen years, was an editor at Coindesk, and is currently the Editor in Chief at Gizmodo. In this conversation we dive into a wide range of topics including 5G, the future of work, blockchains, recommended books, John’s entrepreneurial ventures, his new book (Get Funded), previous books (https://johnbiggsbooks.com/), and practical advice for entrepreneurs.

New podcast on startup branding strategies, plus a new screencast on crypto trading with the Ichimoku Cloud indicator system

I recorded a podcast episode with brand strategist Elisabeth Hass and visual designer Natalie Grummer on all-things startup branding, competitive analysis, naming, logo design. Also, in Q4 2017 I was introduced to a simple indicator system that has proven helpful through bear, horizontal, and bull markets, and I recorded a screencast this morning to share with you all.

Crypto Trading with the Ichimoku Cloud Indicator System

In this video I walk through how I use the Ichimoku system - both algorithmically and manually - for trading bitcoin and other cryptocurrencies on a day-to-day and week-to-week basis. The Ichimoku system is a quick way to assess the current trend of a market and assign probabilities to future movement to inform potential long and short positions.

Home education this fall and beyond, measuring sleep, and Ethereum turns five

I’m excited to release the fourth episode of the Ventures podcast today with my wife Sarah and our friend Abby as guests, check it out. And while many in the crypto community have mixed feelings about the state of the industry, and/or think it’s straight-up boring currently, there are many aspects of the ETH1 to ETH2 transition in particular that are worth learning.

New podcast episode on blockchains. Plus, a new series I'm writing that compares Whoop, Oura Ring, and the Apple Watch

I’m excited to release today the second episode of my new audio/video podcast, Ventures. Also, for those subscribed to my health science topic on Satchel, you may have noticed that I released part one of an article series over the weekend.

Blockchains, the State of the Crypto Ecosystem, Proof-of-Stake, and Figment Networks :: with Lorien Gabel, Andrew Cronk, and Tony Little

In this episode of Ventures we dive into all-things blockchains, the state of the ecosystem, the evolution of the industry (especially since 2017), the nuances between Proof-of-Work and Proof-of-State, and the suite of services that Figment Networks provides. Guests: Lorien Gabel, Andrew Cronk, and Tony Little.

How (and why) to evaluate validator participation in Proof-of-Stake blockchain communities

While the core promise of blockchain technology involves data security, decentralization, and transactional speed/reliability at scale, the main use cases we’ve seen thus far have been limited to long-term value storage (e.g. bitcoin) and programmatic transactions of digital tokens (e.g. ethereum). Understandably, to prove the initial usefulness of the technology, these early networks have optimized their protocols for decentralization and data integrity, rather than transaction speeds and fast finality.

Livepeer is a brilliantly designed crypto network for delivering scaled value (blockchain pioneers, take note)

Well, it’s official: the lofty promises made during the 2017 crypto frenzy have come up dramatically short. The mad rush of teams raising insane amounts of money that year have not (yet) produced mass-adoption of decentralized applications. As every experienced startup investor and founder knows (especially in hindsight), raising a ton of money without a product — let alone a proven market that wants that product — is a recipe for disappointment.

Smart Contracts vs. Application-Specific Blockchains

Besides the addition and subtraction of numbers on a distributed ledger (i.e. cryptocurrencies), blockchains hold the power to provide most — if not all — of the services that centralized computing can provide. Thus, as the community of builders continues to grow, we have seen the very beginning of not only decentralized money, but also decentralized file storage, computing services, financial services, real-life asset ownership records, supply-chain management, personal identity, energy distribution, health records, governance, and more.

An introduction to Proof-of-Stake token yields: Assessing risks and rewards

Although the latest wave of blockchain hype has calmed down this year, the ferocity of teams working on the underlying technology continues to increase. The time is fast approaching when scalable, secure, and decentralized solutions for many core areas of technology (computing, file storage, payments, etc…) will be ready for application developers. When this collective tipping point occurs, there will likely be a rapid transition of user adoption from Web 2.0 apps (centralized) to Web 3.0 apps (decentralized).

An introduction to the Cosmos Network: Why the Internet of Blockchains will help drive mass adoption of decentralized applications

While the scaling problem for blockchains is well understood and being addressed by many teams, what is often overlooked is the interoperability problem and why it matters for the future of crypto. Without protocols in place to enable automated communication between chains, our decentralized projects will continue to remain in silos and our overall ecosystem will remain fractured.